Earthquake History Of The Bay Area

Bay Area earthquake history. Since 1836, there have been five earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area with a magnitude of 6.75 or higher.

The latest San Francisco earthquake reports and news, plus how to prepare.

Bay Area Earthquake Probability Map. Using newly collected data and evolving theories of earthquake occurrence, U.S. Geological Survey and other scientists now conclude that there is a 63% probability of at least one magnitude 6.7 or greater quake, capable of causing widespread damage, striking somewhere in the San Francisco Bay region in the ...

A magnitude 4.4 earthquake shook up the San Francisco Bay Area early Thursday. More than 9.8 million people were estimated to be in the area of the shaking.

A buckled highway just outside of Napa, California, after earthquake struck the area in the early hours of August 24, 2014. Getty . The last major quake along the Hayward fault happened in October of 1868, when a magnitude 6.8 hit the San Francisco Bay region, making it the most destructive earthquake in the state’s history.

Major Earthquake On Bay Area Fault Could Kill 800 People, USGS Predicts The U.S. Geological Survey simulated a 7.0 magnitude earthquake on the Hayward Fault near Oakland, Calif., and found that such a quake could kill hundreds and cause more than $100 billion in damage.

Magnitude 4.4 earthquake centered on the Hayward fault near the UC-Berkeley campus jolts the Bay Area

June 6, 1915 An earthquake with an abrupt rocking motion at 9:51 a.m. June 22, 1915 Earthquake in the Imperial Valley wrecked the towns of Calexico and El Centro.

The history of earthquake investigations in California has been largely focused on the San Andreas Fault System, due to its strong influence in the state as the boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate; it is the most studied fault on Earth.

San Francisco was leveled by an earthquake in 1906 and significantly damaged by another in 1989, but the next big temblor could cause even more destruction than the last big one almost 30 years ago. The U.S. Geological Survey has spearheaded a project to simulate what the aftermath of a 7.0 ...

Sorry, but nothing matched your search terms. Please try again with some different keywords.